We have compiled some excellent COVID-19 updates from various sources here in San Francisco regarding business re-openings, face-mask guidelines, and much more. This information is from other Community Benefit Districts, the City, and other sources.


Dr. Aragón and Director Torres of the Office of Economic Workforce Development recently held a press briefing on the status of San Francisco’s COVID-19 cases, and key indicators the City of SF is watching to determine its reopening plans. Here are some key take-aways:

Why does the City need to pause on reopening on Phase 2B:

  • Increase in cases over the past 7 days has increased 49%.
    Putting us in RED alert.
  • New cases/100,000 people is 5.8%.

What does this mean for reopening?

  • The reopening that had been planned for this past Monday 6/29 for outside bars, massage, nail salons, hair salons, etc. is now delayed. The City will give an update after the July 4th weekend.
  • For right now, SF has not changed the planned July 13th reopening date for inside dining.

Effectively Immediately: New Mask Rules

Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) Agents will be actively checking businesses over the July 4th weekend

The California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) announced it will have agents out ensuring public safety through enforcement of alcoholic beverage laws on the 4th of July weekend. ABC agents will visit ABC licensed businesses to make sure licensees are checking identifications to prevent underage drinking, and that people are staying safe during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Please note, in order to serve alcohol in outdoor spaces obtained by SF’s Shared Spaces program, you will need an approved COVID-19 Temporary Catering Authorization Permit.

SF Diners Must Keep Their Faces Covered for Most of Their Meals

The new mask law is part of a revised best practices guide for the city’s restaurant owners, a directive from Dr. Tomás J. Aragón, the Health Officer of the City and County of San Francisco. Please read the full health directive here.

The updated Directive No. 2020-16b include:

If you’re not actively putting food or drink into your month, your mask must remain on.

Whether you are a small business, or live and work in Japantown, we all need to be mindful of our actions. If you can continue to shelter-in place, do so. When you go out, wear a mask, remain socially distanced by six feet, and wash your hands often. Safety starts with each of us.

What Restaurants Can Do Now to Prepare for Dine-In Stage

SWCBD staff has been attending important webinars that focuses on restaurant dine-in stage. Organizations such as the Golden Gate Restaurant Association (GGRA) have been providing valuable information for the restaurant community. Here is a link to the June 18 webinar: Reopening Operations and Strategies in a Socially-Distanced World: Part 1

As the next phase of indoor dining is just a few weeks away, now is the time for restaurants to take a careful look at their reopening strategy and safety plans. It’s not a matter of just turning on your OPEN sign. Your staff and customers need to be reassured that you’ve taken measures to keep them safe and protected.

Here are a few items to start discussing with your managers/staff:

  • Get tested. There are free testing sites for essential workers throughout the City.
  • Invest in Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – especially masks, hand sanitizers, gloves and EPA approved cleaning supplies.
  • Create a safety plan for your employees.
  • Knowing that restaurants will only be able to have 50% seating capacity, start planning your seating layout.
  • Let your customers know what you are actively doing to keep them and your staff safe (i.e.: QR code menus, temperature checks, serving staff dedicated to one table (customers may see less of their server), single use serving utensils, etc.
  • Stagger employee scheduling – to have less contact between employees and shifts.
  • Contactless Menu: Let customers access your menu through QR code.
  • Look at your current menu. Consider simplifying it to keep your costs down as well as prep time. Simplify for price & efficiency.
  • Get tested. There are free testing sites for essential workers throughout the City.
  • Invest in Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – especially masks, hand sanitizers, gloves and EPA approved cleaning supplies.
  • Create a safety plan for your employees.
  • Knowing that restaurants will only be able to have 50% seating capacity, start planning your seating layout.
  • Let your customers know what you are actively doing to keep them and your staff safe (i.e.: QR code menus, temperature checks, serving staff dedicated to one table (customers may see less of their server), single use serving utensils, etc.
  • Stagger employee scheduling – to have less contact between employees and shifts.
  • Contactless Menu: Let customers access your menu through QR code.
  • Look at your current menu. Consider simplifying it to keep your costs down as well as prep time. Simplify for price & efficiency.

Please continue to stay safe & healthy,

SWCBD Staff
[email protected]
(415) 960-7228

Additional Resources
Coronavirus (COVID-19) Health Orders from DPH
Health Directives for business operations
Social Distancing Protocol (fillable version)

Outdoor Retail
Guidance for Curbside Retail
Health & Safety Plan for Retail (6/13/2020)

Dental Offices
Guidance for Dental Care
Health & Safety Plan for Dental Service (6/15/2020)

Outdoor Dining
In-Person Outdoor Dining Guidance
Additional Safety Plan
Health & Safety Plan for Outdoor Dining

Information for Shared Space

Restaurants/Delivery Take-Out
Restaurants/Delivery Take-Out Directive
Health & Safety Plan Template for Food Preparation & Delivery Essential Businesses (SFDPH, 5/8/2020)
HSP for 2020-05 (word template)

Offices
Health Directive for Offices
Guidance for Offices
Health & Safety Plan for Offices (6/13/2020)

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